The Future

2011

Drama / Fantasy / Romance

4
IMDb Rating 6.2 10 8197

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
January 03, 2020 at 07:33 AM

Director

Cast

Angela Trimbur as Dance Studio Receptionist
Miranda July as Sophie / Voice of Paw-Paw
Isabella Acres as Gabriella
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
833.78 MB
1280*714
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
1 hr 30 min
P/S 35 / 68
1.67 GB
1920*1072
English 5.1
R
23.976 fps
1 hr 30 min
P/S 28 / 72

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by evanston_dad 7 / 10

Fear of Commitment

An odd-duck couple who have had plenty of years to be married (read: get bored) and far too much time on their hands decide to adopt a cat. They can't pick it up for a month because it's undergoing some medical treatments, and they're warned that if they fail to arrive on the designated date the cat will be euthanized. The prospect of that last month of freedom before they make a commitment to something other than themselves opens up a fissure in their lives and threatens to destroy a complacency they had begun to take for granted.

The fact that adopting a cat counts in their lives as a commitment great enough to alter their lives forever should tell you a little something about the personalities of these main characters, and if we end up being fed up with both of them, and her especially, I think we're meant to. It's nearly impossible to sympathize with people whose lives are basically so cushy that taking on a pet takes on the momentous proportions of a major life event -- but then I think of my own life, and how good I basically have it, and how good even the most average American basically has it, and how most of my problems would seem pretty petty to a lot of other people out there in the world, and realize that maybe what annoys me about these characters are the qualities I see in them that most annoy me about myself.

"The Future" I think is a cautionary tale about what happens to people when they spend all of their lives worrying about what their lives could be instead of accepting what their lives actually are. At some point, everyone gets to an age where he or she has to simply commit to SOMETHING, whether it be another person, a child, a cause, a pet, a life path, a career. Whatever it is, they have to make a conscious choice to make the best of what they have and stop worrying about what could have been. Easier said than done, probably, or many many people would be much happier.

I liked "The Future" well enough while I was watching it, but I can't say it really stuck with me. Miranda July has an off-beat writing and directorial (not to mention acting) style that will probably turn off some. I'm o.k. with it, and I must say that for once it was refreshing to see a movie in which it's the female rather than the male who does a worse job of dealing with a mid-life crisis. Thank you Ms. July for equaling the playing field a bit.

Grade: B

Reviewed by ferguson-6 7 / 10

Flash of Light

Greetings again from the darkness. Thanks to her 2005 debut film ME AND YOU AND EVERYONE WE KNOW, I became a fan of Miranda July. Unfortunately that means reading a few of her short stories and waiting six years for her second film. There is no rushing creative genius, and there is certainly no obvious goal for capitalistic gains. With her second film, it appears she will somehow generate even fewer viewers, despite being a festival favorite.

The movie is bookended by the narration of Paw-Paw, an injured cat waiting to be adopted by Sophie (Miranda July) and Jason (Hamish Linklater). In the cat's voice we hear the hope of a new life - one that includes love and security. Things aren't quite the same from the perspective of our two heroes.

Sophie and Hamish are in many ways a typical couple. They sometimes speak their own language and when things are going good, they believe they can conquer all. However, hitting a bump means much doubt and and an avalanche of self-defeatist attitudes. The latest bump is the belief that adopting this cat will suck the freedom right out of their daily lives ... in fact, they discuss the fact that because of their age (35), life and dreams are basically over. So, with 30 days til adoption, they seek to live life to the fullest. You know, before it's all over.

They both quit the jobs that have evidently been the burden keeping them from greater purpose. Jason works from home as an IT Help Desk agent and Sophie is the absolute worst dance instructor for kids in existence. Jason tries to find meaning by selling trees to save the environment. Sophie decides to make youtube videos - 30 Dances in 30 Days, but with such mounting pressure, ends up under the bed covers before even one video is complete.

These two remind me of 8 year olds with advanced vocabularies. Somehow they think society or the universe owes them something and just by dreaming big, their lives will be complete. They each believe they have special powers: Sophie can move things with her mind (not really) and Jason can stop time (not sure). We see Jason fall under the spell of the most interesting character in the film - an octogenarian played by Joe Putterlik. We see Sophie fall into bed with Marshall (David Warshofsky), a 50ish single dad living in the suburbs.

So here is some of what the film offers us: a slacker couple in a rundown apartment, same couple overwhelmed by the burden of adopting a cat, a crawling security blanket (t-shirt) that stalks its owner, a narrating cat, an empty affair with a mis-matched couple, an old man philosopher and his dirty-talk greeting cards, a discussion with the moon (yes, the moon), a young girl (wonderful Isabella Acres) who buries herself in the backyard with the approval of her dad, and (twice) the terrific Peggy Lee song "Where or When".

Ms. July is a fabulous observer of life and people and personalities. She seems to understand doubt, dreams and carries an interest in what time lapse really means for us. Her manner of making these points and sharing her insight is quite off-beat from what we typically see in movies. I believe that makes it more important that she continue to produce her works. Unlike what I will say about her character in this film, The Future looks awfully bright for Miranda July.

Reviewed by andre_cs 5 / 10

Prisoner Of Freedom

Directed, scripted and starring by Miranda July, The Future is a film that has been selected for the Berlin Film Festival in 2011 and the 2011 Sundance Film Festival.

The story revolves around a couple that proposes a change in your life. They hate their jobs and the idea of adopting a cat makes it arise a new way of life. However what is proposed as a change eventually becomes routine. The fear of failure and responsibility makes the personality of both becomes complicated and often result surreal. The time is always the reason for the changes. The fear of an uncertain future and nonconformity with the present makes it parodies on numerous occasions the fact of stop the time. Specifically, the period in which Sophie and Jason are prepared to adopt a cat is the time when the personality of both becomes strange. There are surreal elements and nonsense conversations that show complex emotional states. The failure in work and routine makes Sophie feel prisoner to her feelings. The figure of Sophie has no splendor. It is a figure off and apparently weak. Her look is sad and never denotes happiness. In the same way the character of Jason is strange. He is the partner of Sophie and lives with her in a small flat and messy. His way of understanding things is similar to Sophie. Both fear the passage of time and want to be free. Marshall's character represents the freedom for Sophie. The way in which both are known is strange and simultaneously comic. Sophie looks out the window screaming and tries to listen to Marshall. The scene reflects a comparison: Sophie appears as imprisoned in her own home and as the only escape she has the window that looks out for help. The fact that the cat, paw paw, has a voice allowed to know their feelings and desires. The image is of an animal that is locked behind bars waiting for a change in his life, hoping in this case to be adopted. The comparison is similar to Sophie. Both are locked and desire freedom. The passing of time is also reflected in this character and appear feelings like frustration or even desperation to be adopted.

It's a surreal and complex film. The argument at first is easy but when the acts are performed we can see each character's feelings. We can see a lot of nonsense and abstract scenes. Adopting a pet is just an excuse for the change. I would like to highlight the rhetorical conversations about the passing of time, old age or the future. Personally I find this film hard to understand. There are many situations that make no sense as the act of talking to the moon, giving life to a shirt or the fact stop time. I think film is not made to be enjoyed, but it raises very philosophical thoughts on life. The emotional charge of the characters leads to surreal situations and even extravagant. These situations, in my opinion, have more weight than the argument itself.

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